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Showing posts from 2008

Maureen's prefered tips

By Maureen Rowe


Try hooking lettering with a plaid if your background is flat. Pick one of the colours, which picks up the background  colour or from another flat colour used elsewhere in the rug. Also when hooking letters, hook a row of background at the top and at the bottom of the letters to be hooked, then hook the letters snugly up to the hooked background rows.


After hooking with your head bent forward for awhile, put your feet flat on the floor and let your head hang backwards for a few moments for relief of neck tension.

When whipping the corner of a rug, hold a small piece of matching wool over each corner piece and whip over that.  You won't need to use as thick a layer of yarn to cover.


Submitted by Maureen Rowe and taken from…

Show & Tell - December 2008

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Candles In The Window Hooked by Denise Vandenbemden
We wanted to do something special for our 2008 exhibition and the first idea was to create a small piece with candles. I love stained glass and downloaded, from the Internet, a free stained glass pattern reminding me of the beautiful windows in art deco houses. I adapted it to my own taste by making it a double window and choosing the pastel colors I like, although these are more often seen in church windows than in art deco houses. I added the candles and that was it. The result is what you see here. The size is 16 x 16" hooked on burlap with cut #4. The colors are dyed on new natural wool.

Memory Of My Wedding Day Designed and Hooked by Maureen Rowe
Our wedding photographer made a composite photograph of my husband Hugh and me, kissing inside a brandy glass on a table next to a candle and a rose. So this rug is my recreation of a wonderful memory of May 21, 1977.



Christmas Candles Hooked by Denise Morissette

I was looking for an inspi…

Show & Tell - October 2008

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Laurierville, Quebec, my village Designed and Hooked by Denise Morissette
The landscape reproduces the countryside where I grew up. These images are a product of my imagination and memory of the beautiful Appalachian region where I lived my youngest years. I choose to recreate the color of spring when nature wakens after the winter. Photos are used as model for the design of houses and the church of the village. The dimension is 39 x 26 ½inches. This work is made with number 6 and 3 cuts. The wool used is from clothes bought in second hand stores. For the sky I used wool bought by the meter. The graduated blue color was done under the supervision of Lois Morris in a workshop on dyeing.


Floral Fantasy # 1 Designed and Hooked by Sylvia Salomon
I like crewel-type florals and I like to draw my own pattern. This is an asymmetrical design with different kinds of flowers with a bird and two butterflies as accents. I created it two years ago and I had a wonderful time hooking it. I used a # 5 cut. I…

Show 2008

Beaconsfield Rug Hooking Exhibition,  September 27th-28th, 2008 at Centennial Hall by Maureen Rowe
Every two years, our Guild hosts an exhibition of our members’ most recent rugs.  This year, we had 53 new pieces and there were approximately 100 visitors who signed our guest book. It was held on a Saturday and Sunday. On Sunday afternoon, Centennial Hall was part of Beaconsfield’s Culture Day whereby 11 different artists’ studios were on display including our own venue.  Our pieces were arranged in two rooms on the first floor and two rooms on the second floor. Coffee and cookies were available while visitors could watch a rug hooking how-to video and/or play an interactive Sudoku game on Brenda Ticehurst’s rug. A Guild challenge had been offered to do a rose rug and/or a candle rug, so some of these were on display as well.



Lois Morris / In the News

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Lois J Morris exhibits her rugs at Rawdon
On October 5th, the exhibition will take place at CIM (Centre d'nterprétation Multhiethnique de Rawdon). The solo exhibition will be available for public display on Saturdays and Sundays from 1 pm to 4 pm, until the end of December.

Click for a larger image and to read the article (only in french)

St-Jean 2008

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This year again, Centennial Hall was the meeting place for the Fête nationale du Québec in Beaconsfield.   Sylvia Solomon, Claire Fradette, Denise Vandenbemden et Denise Morissette  of the Beaconsfield Hooking Crafters Guild gave rug hooking demonstrations throughout the event. 




Show & Tell - June 2008

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For the launching of our Web site, we chose an aquatic theme inspired by the Lac St-Louis -which is a door step of our guild house-, the Internet navigation and the concept of being "hooked".

Fisherman Designed and hooked by Lorayne Charenko
This is a rug I made with Lois Morris in one of her portrait workshops. I learned a lot about shadows and portraits and I was very excited. After this course, I was looking at people differently, observing shadows skins tones, people’s noses and other features. I was looking for an inspiration for my portrait and I found it in a National Geographic Magazine. I saw a male portrait and I decided to do one fisherman smoking a pipe. So, this is an adaptation from a picture in an old National Geographic Magazine. I used a number 3 and 4 cut. I over dyed old pieces and material reclaim and I dyed the background myself.


Haida Whale Designed and hooked by Sally Perodeau
It was once believed a whale could capture a canoe and transform its occupants int…

BHCG 2008 Picnic

A nice Picnic...indoors!


3 Teacher's tips

by Lois Morris

1 When hooking in a small area with a limited amount of space or when shading in a small area, remember this:  if you zig-zag your loops, it will appear to have more colour and the next colours will fit between the previous loops and you will not get a striped look.

2 The selvedge of your wool is not always good to hook with. Tear the selvedge off. Keep the strip and when you are making a dye formula, cut a few short pieces, soak them well and dip them in your solution and squeeze the water out and you will see the approximate light shade you will achieve. This will help you know if you have the colour you want and whether you need to make adjustments.   
N.B.  Remember when you remove the selvedge to make some slashes in the top of your wool so you rip and cut it in the proper direction.


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If you are hooking a piece that you plan to hang, this is a good idea:  by having it mounted on a stretcher frame, you can …

How to hook a stained glass piece

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by Denise Vandenbemden
Hooking stained glass is actually very easy. The best thing to do is to go to a stained glass supply store and have a good look at the different kinds of glass. Some is mottled, some is spotted and some looks hammered and the choice is endless. Explain your interest to the store keeper and ask if you can take a few pictures. I would suggest you spot-dye your wool. Outline the "glass pieces" on the lines of your pattern and fill in hooking straight or in diagonal or circles to achieve the  desired effect. The outline should be black if you are using strong colors, with light colors charcoal looks better. 


For a pattern you can use Ed Sibbet Jr.'s "Stained glass coloring books" from an art and craft store. The patterns may be used without special authorization.

Stained glass imitation hooked in 2006 with wool fabric on burlap in a # 4 cut. Pattern is an adapted design from the ''Art Nouveau Stained Glass Coloring book'' by Ed S…

Flyer 2008

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Click to enlarge


A little fish with Big Dreams

The Beaconsfield Rug Hooking Web site is a new little fish in the InternetSea. We need to feed it and help it to grow. Our little fish will swim from our club house into Lac St-Louis and he will go to the ocean of his dreams and imagination.  

We are open to new ideas and suggestions to develop this Internet project. We are continuously updating this site. One month after the opening we have created a French version of this site (February 19th). We also added three sections called "Works in progress" and "Glossary of terms", as well as the "Recipes" page.

Members of the Guild can collaborate in many ways: adding your comments, writing rug hooking tips, sending pictures of …

President's Message _ 2008

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President 's message
Denise Vandenbemden
OurWeb site has been created because the time has come to take our Guild into the 21st century and because rug hooking is a beautiful and artistic way of recycling. It is an old craft from a time when recycling was done out of need. It is a craft that should be kept alive because it is not only useful, but it has also evolved into an enjoyable fiber art.
This craft or art is ideal for anyone, especially young retirees who want to live a fulfilling and active live, learning, socializing and creating something beautiful and useful with their own hands. 
You don't need any special or artistic skills and anyone can do it. Don't worry if you don't have a creative mind; there is a wide choice of free copyright rug hooking patterns available to be used as well as a lot of help ideas to be had from the new friends you will make in our Guild.  
Through our website, we aim to make this craft more accessible to the public and get you hooked on…

Rug hooking: is it difficult?

It is as easy or as difficult as you want. The technique is easy and the pattern is up to you. A simple pattern can be just as pretty as a complicated one. There are no rug hooking rules, just a few guidelines, that is all. If you never hooked before and don't know anything about it, choose a small rug in a simple geometric pattern and you will not be disappointed. Any of our members will be more than happy to help and guide you.

Our Website is On-line!

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Our Website has been launched on January 28th 2008!



Show & Tell - January 2008

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For the launching of our Web site, we chose an aquatic theme inspired by the Lac St-Louis -which is a door step of our guild house-, the Internet navigation and the concept of being "hooked".


Kiss the Cod, Goodbye Designed and Hooked by Judith Dallegret

The story of my Cod Fish rug This rug is hooked in very wide strips of number 9 and 10 (1/2”) wool, all hand dyed by myself. I like a primitive textured antique look for my own work. The bright colours will disappear over time, but it won’t matter, as that is the life of a hooked mat. The rainbow design was used in the old days for quilt and rugs.
Why a Cod Fish? Having strong roots to Nova Scotia and being a great, great granddaughter of sailing captains who ventured around the world on the tall seas, I have always had a love and respect of the sea and all that lives in the oceans. My most notorious great, great, great-grandfather, was Capt. David Morehouse who found the very famous mysterious ghost ship the “Marie Celeste” saili…

Copyright

Copyright © 2008-2019 - Beaconsfield Hooking Crafters Guild. All Rights Reserved.

Copyright laws protect all materials contained in this Website. Many of the rugs are original designs of our members which may not be reproduced or used in any context whatsoever without written permission of the Beaconsfield Hooking Crafters Guild. Other rugs are original designs of rug hooking artists or rug hooking companies and may not be reproduced without permission of the copyright owner.