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Sunday, January 1, 2012

Show & Tell / January 2012


Lois Morris

This is a selection of rugs from our September 2010 retrospective exhibition, held at Centennial Hall, to celebrate the Guild’s 35th anniversary.


A Young Girl’s Wish List
Designed and hooked by Lois Morris


This hooking is my interpretation of what most young girls think is the Big Deal: clothes, jewellery, flowers, money, a good time and a man.

This is a multi-media rug hooked with a variety of fabrics other than the usual wool. The gold fabric cinched in the centre represents clothing, the belt was hooked using gold leather, with a tortoise shell buckle in the centre.  The hat was made using multi-coloured velour yarn with clipped loops. The necklace, earrings, handle and frame of the purse are hooked in chain stitch using elastic cord. A gold button is the clasp, while the ring is a silver filigrane button. Le martini glass and contents were hooked out of a clear plastic bag cut on #3. The bracelets are done with ribbon and silver cord, while the scarf and boots were made with leftover wool; black buttons ornament the boots.




Track!
Designed and Hooked by Louise G. de Tonnancour

Maple Street in Shawinigan, Quebec, was on a hill. When I was a child, over the Christmas holidays, we would spend hours sliding down the snow-covered sidewalks. As a moment in time, I pictured my brother, Jacques, screaming “Track” at the top of his lungs to warn pedestrians to get out of the way…despite this an old lady did land on the toboggan and sped downhill in his arms.




Winter Scene - Jeanne Osler
Winter Scene
Jeanne Osler
(adapted from a print)

I was inspired to hook this rug to preserve the happy memory of an old print that hung in my parent’s house ever since I can remember. My grandparents may even have previously owned it. The print was untitled and the artist unknown; it represented a winter scene seemingly in a North Shore Quebec village, mid 1800’s to early 1900. We had a running joke in the family, one of my uncles would always turn it upside-down when he came to visit, and we all waited to see how long it took my mother to notice.